During The Tall Ship Glenlee’s 125th celebrations, the Clyde Maritime Trust announced ambitious plans to ensure the Clyde built vessel is ship shape for future generations to learn and enjoy from its unique maritime past.

Launched on 3 December 1896, the ship’s name and use was changed several times, something that ultimately ensured she is still afloat today.

Glenlee is an important survivor, being one of the last three-masted Clyde-built ship afloat in the UK, having been restored to provide a space for learning, heritage and entertainment.

Among the plans recently announced, the charity that owns the ship intends to change its name to The Tall Ship Glenlee Trust, to ensure the charitable status of the Glenlee is better understood by visitors.

Glasgow comedian Elaine C. Smith recently added her support to the charity’s endeavours after discovering the ship’s figurehead ship was named by the volunteers who restored the ship after her character ‘Mary Doll’.

Since reopening following the easing of Covid-19 restrictions, the trustees, volunteers and staff have worked to refresh their vision to inspire people worldwide in the history and development of the iconic ship, Glenlee, through enjoyable, engaging, and informative experiences.

The announcements were made as part of the 125th Anniversary Celebrations on board as supporters and volunteers gathered to mark the historic date.

The Lord Provost Phillip Braat was among the speakers paying tribute to the work that has ensured The Tall Ship Glenlee is one of Glasgow’s iconic visitor attractions.

The Lord Provost Phillip Braat said. “The Glenlee has been part of the Glasgow Skyline for the last 25 years or so but she has been an ambassador for shipbuilding on the Clyde. The many Trustees, volunteers and staff who have served to keep her afloat since she was rescued from Spain in 1992 are a credit to the ship and the city.”

To round off a weekend of celebrations, the Director of National Historic Ships, Hannah Cunliffe, presented the annual lecture on 6 December entitled: “A tall ship and a star to steer her by, Setting a Course for the Future of Maritime Heritage”.

This follows on from the recent award of Static Flagship of the Year 2021 by National Historic Ships, the official organisation for over 1300 historic vessels around the UK.

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